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I believe that learning is a lifelong journey. I conduct workshops and training sessions helping learners of all ages develop their skills in critical thinking, reading, and communication. This site is an ongoing presentation of the conversations along my learning path. So join me.

Together We Are Smarter!



Dear readers,

As you might notice, I have a new site. The address is the same:

www.angelamaiers.com

However, if you are reading this message, then you are reading my old Feedburner feed over which I have no control and I can't get the new posts to appear on it. So please, use the new feed address, which is:

http://feeds.feedburner.com/AngelaMaiersBlog

Hopefully I'll have the issues with the old one resolved soon, so I will be able to merge them again.

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Get Ready for a Passion-Driven Conversation!

Screen shot 2010-10-31 at 3.14.06 PM What happens when a small group of passionate people get together to talk about what they feel most passionate about? If you believe Margaret Meed, they can change the world!

Well, hang on, becuase we are getting ready to do some world-changin' or at the very least, conversation-changin'. I have spent the last year researching, writing, and speaking about the importance of passion in our work and in the world.

No one disagrees with the premise or that passion is a factor in both individual and organizational success. We just have a lot of questions about it.

Questions like:

  • What is passion...really?
  • How do you define passion?
  • How could/does passion change the game?
  • How does passion present itself in your work? life? organization?
  • What does it mean for you? our students? your community? clients? the world?
  • Can passion be “taught”?
  • How is passion different than engagement?
  • What conditions are necessary for passion to exist?
  • Is passion a necessary  or a “nice to have” quality?
  • What are the repercussions of being a “passion-less” person or organization?
  • Can we quantify passion? If so, how?
  • What is misunderstood about passion?
  • What can we do to change this? move the conversation forward?

These are questions that need to be approached and explored from many angles, so I have invited a diverse group of genius minds to the table. We have award winning educators, bloggers, college professors, children’s book writers, scientists, small business owners, leaders from the education and corporate world, social media gurus and consultants, three New York Times best selling authors, parents, and of course, students!

The conversation will be grand, and I can hardly wait to hear all your perspectives.

Here are some posts to get you fired up and ready to join us! Enjoy!


Photo on Flickr by Grzegorz

We are tweeting nuggets of the conversation using the hashtag #passiondriven

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October 2010 Reflections

Pumpkin Face!Image by ehavir via Flickr

Good Morning Friends! I can not believe how fast the month has gone.

Here's a look back at the most clicked on, talked about, and Re-tweeted conversations:

 

  1. Stopping Cyber Crime - Answers to Important Questions
  2. Stopping the Cyber Bully - Conversation with the Experts
  3. TEDxRedmond - Power to the Students
  4. The "BESTS" from #BlogChat with @Copyblogger
  5. My book is done, let the conversations begin!
  6. Follow These Leaders - I Do!
  7. Let's Talk About What is RIGHT with Schools! #Educationnation
  8. White Paper on Student Engagement
  9. From the Archives: A 21st Century Professional Development Proposal
  10. Changing Education Paradigms - Sir Ken and RSA Animat

I hope everyone had a great week and will have an even more fantastic weekend. I can't wait to see what November brings!

Related Posts:

 

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Chalk Talk 10/29/10 - Twitter Chat Tools

ChalktalkChalk Talk Friday represents conversations and brilliance I've discovered traversing my way through the Blogosphere.  From professional to personal development, these are the posts and links have in some way touched my head or my heart.

I have been learning so much lately from participating in Twitter Chats.

I am working on an upcoming post about the process, but these are the tools that have helped me make the most of the Chat Expereince!

  • TweetChat: My favorite! This Web based app lets you enter chat room name, enter your comments into the box without adding the hashtag, and publishes your chat contribution into the stream of conversation automatically. I love it!
  • TweetGrid: Web-based app that can monitor more than one hashtag or chat. Enter the name or hashtag into the search box, sign in so you can tweet away with ease.
  • TweetDeck: A favorite among many for managing their tweets, but a great platform to stay connected during a Twitter Chat.
  • TweeTree: This app helps you monitor hashtags and keywords. No reply option, but nice for seeing the original tweet or viewing the link to post within TweetTwee. Also allows you to share conversation with others by sending the unique URL.
  • Twemes: Follows your tweets with hashtags. This cool service provides an easy to remember URL to the chat or chats, such as http://twemes.com/edchat. Twemes has a right column that highlights hot topics, links and photos for the entire hashtag and group.
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Infographic - Identity Theft...It's bigger than you think!

Identity Crisis: The Numbers Behind Identity Theft
CreditRepair.org


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8th Graders Rock the Stage at 140 Conference (#140conf)

If you have ever been in a conversation about the value of Twitter, you may have heard things like:  What's the point? Why would I care what people are having in their coffee? I don't have time to mess around with something so lame? 

Share this video of eighth grade teacher, George Haines and his students presenting at Jeff Pulver's 140 Character Conference (#140conf). Broadcasting live to a global audience of thousands, they described how they used Twitter in their class project on the classic, Animal Farm. (When I was in 8th grade, I was lucky to do a project that three people would see.)

Thank goodness this teacher did not listen, and gave this crazy little "140 character thing" a whirl.

Enjoy! You may even have a whole new take on the book...I did!

 

 

Mr. Haines is @oline73 on Twitter if you want to connect.

 

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Stopping Cyber Crime - Answers to Important Questions

Earlier this week, I introduced you to leading Cyber crime experts, Jeff Floreno and Rosalind Jackson.

Jeff Floreno serves as Director of Operations and Security Strategy at Wren Solutions, where he serves as a subject matter expert on school security and delivers solutions that create safe learning environments.  With over 25 years of developing violence prevention strategies, Floreno is particularly interested in the transition of bullying from the schoolyard to the workplace. 

Rosalind Jackson is owner of Train Intervene Prevent™, a consulting business that caters to proactive organizations focusing on workplace violence prevention strategies.  Jackson, with 20 years of developing violence prevention strategies, is passionate about minimizing the occurrence and impact of violence and bulling in today’s society.

Jeff Floreno_headshot_hires Rosalind Jackson


They have been considering the questions you sent in this the month via Twitter and the blog, and have done their best to provide us with answers and advice on this critical topic.

I have included the entire interview below:

 

1.  Besides the means of communication and/or technologies involved, what are the major differences between cyber bullying and traditional bullying?

“The act of cyberbullying is really an extension of traditional bullying, but it’s different in many ways.  Because of the means of attack, cyberbullying provides a level of anonymity that traditional bullying does not.  This makes it easier for an aggressor to bully someone without having direct, face-to-face contact.  Unfortunately, this removes inhibitions and perhaps encourages more perpetrators who may not otherwise be courageous enough to confront victims in person.”  - Rosalind Jackson

“Thanks to the Internet, computers and cell phones, cyberbullying can be relentless, occurring on a 24/7 basis as opposed to traditional bullying, which is done primarily on campus during school hours or on the bus.  Bullying, by nature, is limited by physical location, whereas cyberbullying reaches into every aspect of the child’s life and offers no break from the humiliation, even at home and after hours.  This often makes cyberbullying even more devastating to the victim than traditional bullying.”  - Rosalind Jackson

“The reach of cyberbullying is much greater than traditional bullying.  Traditional bullying may occur in front of a small group of kids, whereas insults, rumors, and unwanted photos can be spread to hundreds or even thousands in an instant using the Internet and social media outlets, exponentially increasing the damage and humiliation associated with the attack.”  - Jeff Floreno

2.  How prevalent is this problem? What are the emerging areas of research on cyber bullying? What are the biggest misconceptions around this issue?

“The biggest misconception about cyberbullying on the part of the perpetrators and their peers, is that it is not a big deal.  Like traditional bullying, the perpetrators of cyberbullying realize that they are being mean and hurtful to the victim, but they think it is fun and that it makes them look ‘cool’ to their friends.  Too often, they do not truly understand the consequences of their acts or realize that they may even be committing a crime.  The tragedy of cyberbullying is the failure to understand the extent of the devastation, up to and including suicide by the victim, and a jail sentence for the perpetrator.  Parents are also guilty of underestimating the gravity of cyberbullying.  Many believe that it’s just ‘kids being kids’ and don’t realize how it can impact the life of their child.” – Jeff Floreno

3.  Is there a particular demographic that is most at risk? Who is most likely to be a cyber bully? Who is most likely to be a victim of cyber bullying?  Is there a typical “profile” ?

“In the ‘Fight Crime; Invest in Kids’ survey, 17% of 6-11 year olds and 36% of 12-17 year olds reported that someone said threatening or embarrassing things about them in e-mails, instant messages, web sites, chat rooms or text messages.  Cyberbullying: Bullying in the Digital Age, a book by Kowalski, Limber and Agatston concludes that more girls engage in cyberbullying than boys.  But victims span all ages, races, beliefs, and socio-economic backgrounds.  Because there are so many motivations behind cyberbullying, there is no single profile for a victim.  A child might become a victim based on jealousy of friends or other students - or because of their race, their beliefs, their size, their weight.  Kids can choose to cyberbully other kids based on countless factors.” - Rosalind Jackson

4. Is there anything educators can do to prevent cyber bullying from occurring? What can school personnel do to intervene in cyber bullying?

“Awareness is a critical first step.  Schools should implement anonymous reporting channels and investigate all reported incidences.  Teachers, administrators and parents should work together to look for signs of kids being ostracized or withdrawn.  It’s very important to treat information confidentially.  Administrators, the SRO, counselors and the school nurse may all be resources for victims, providing advice and support.” – Jeff Floreno 

5.  If you or someone you know is being harassed, bullied, embarrassed or bothered online, what do they need to do first? What rights do "victims" of cyber crime have?
 
“The first step for victims is to let someone know what is happening.  Resources from parents to teachers, administrators and law enforcement can help victims get the support they need and know what action can be taken.” – Jeff Floreno

To whom should parents, teachers, individuals report suspected cyber bullying, and under what circumstances?  What sort of documentation should be kept, if any?

“Communication is key!!!  Parents and victims should advise their School Resource Officer (SRO) of any cyberbullying attacks.  It is advisable to print or download the information to share with the SRO.  This information should not be deleted until the SRO or school representative has had an opportunity to assess the situation.” – Jeff Floreno

6.  What are the important legal issues surrounding cyber bullying?

“Although it can be difficult for school administrators and SROs to successfully discipline students for cyberbullying that takes place off campus without the possibility of lawsuits for exceeding their authority or violating the students’ rights, it is possible for schools to work together with law enforcement, students, parents and staff to address cyberbullying.  The legal challenges are obvious: the fact that bullying is taking place in cyberspace as opposed to on campus makes it difficult to assign jurisdiction.  In addition, since bullying is being done in words in many cases, there is potential for ‘freedom of speech’ arguments to be made.  Administrators should stay informed about state and federal laws surrounding cyberbullying, which are constantly changing due to the prevalence of the issue.” – Jeff Floreno

7.  What is the best way to prevent this crime from happening? At what grade to you advocate for the implementation of cyberbullying curriculum?

“The best plan for preventing cyberbullying is threefold:
Teach respect for others.  All children, starting a very young age, should be taught to show respect for others. These values should be taught presumably in the home, in a family setting and then fostered through school and other social settings.  However, specific programming for kids teaching them about respect for others has been successful in some settings and helps them relate to the experience of the victim.
Share the consequences.  Once students realize that their ‘fun’ can result in humiliation, devastation and even suicide, they may be less willing to commit acts of cyberbullying.  In addition, if they realize the potential consequences as an attacker, such as incarceration, they may think twice before doing it.
Maintain an open-door policy – Schools that keep an open door policy and encourage anonymous reporting of incidences from victims or even bystanders, can understand the level and type of cyberbullying and other bullying at their school and can implement disciplinary and educational programming.” 
– Jeff Floreno


8.  Can you suggest resources or programs that would be helpful for teachers and parents in supporting these conversations and lessons?

There is some great information available online.
HRSA’s Stop Bullying Now website has a good site for parents and teachers and some good statistics.


The National Crime Prevention Council has some good information on cyberbullying
Cyberbullying Research Center

 

Thank you for all that you are doing to combat this issue in your own schools and communities. Please keep the dialogue going. Silence is a cyber-criminal's best weapon.

 

Together We Are Smarter. What's Your Take? Comment Here.

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Chalk Talk 10/22/10

ChalktalkChalk Talk Friday represents conversations and brilliance I've discovered traversing my way through the Blogosphere.  From professional to personal development, these are the posts and links have in some way touched my head or my heart.

 

  • Writing Fun  What a great site to motivate writers while enhancing their writing skills.
  • The Awesome Highlighter lets you highlight text on web pages and then gives you a small link to the highlighted page. 
  • ChatPast – Allows you to access to past chat logs and web conversations by letting put them in a cloud storage, so that you can easily retrieve them from any computer?
  • One word is another great way to jumpstart your writing brain by showing you "one word". You'll seethe one word at the top of your screen and then will have sixty seconds to write about it. Just click 'go' and write!
  • Glickr is a fun little tool that allows you to animate your images.

 

 

 

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Stopping the Cyber Bully - Conversation with the Experts

Be against cyberbullying.Image via Wikipedia

Did you know October is National Anti-Bullying Awareness Month?

Cyberbullying is unfortunately something that is impacting kids from elementary school all the way through adulthood.  While considered by many as an extension of traditional bullying, cyberbullying is distinct in many ways that make responding to incidences particularly challenging; something I wrote about recently in The Social Media Explorer.

I am thrilled to be hosting an upcoming discussion on my blog with leading experts answering our questions on what we can do to combat this dangerous and even deadly problem.  In this interview, Jeff Floreno and Rosalind Jackson will answers our key questions about the nature of cyberbullying and the challenges this relatively new phenomenon poses to school administrators, parents and students. With the growing prevalence of cyberbullying, this information is critical to readers who want to understand the problem and recognizing the impact before it gets serious.

Here's who we will be talking to. If you have questions, please comment on this post or send me an email, and I will see what we can do to get them addressed.

Here is who we will be talking with:

  • JeffFloreno serves as Director of Operations and Security Strategy at Wren, where he serves as a subject matter expert on school security and delivers solutions that create safe learning environments.  With over 25 years of developing violence prevention strategies, Floreno is particularly interested in the transition of bulling from the schoolyard to the workplace. 
  • Rosalind Jackson is owner of Train Intervene Prevent™, a consulting business that caters to proactive organizations focusing on workplace violence prevention strategies.  Jackson, with 20 years of developing violence prevention strategies, is passionate about minimizing the occurrence and impact of violence and bulling in today’s society.

I am excited to have this opportunity, and look forward to learning more about what we can do to stop this horrible crime from happening to anyone; young or grown.

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Changing Education Paradigms - Sir Ken and RSA Animate

Thanks to a Tweet from Stephen Dill , I discovered another great video to share by the amazing creatives at RSA Annimate. Check out what they did with Dan Pink's book, Drive, here.

This time they took the popular and compelling presentation by Sir Ken Robinson, of TED Talk fame, and animated it on a whiteboard while he delivered his speech to a live audience.

The presentation alone is a must watch and re-watch, but I am equally enthrawlled with the power and potential of visual synthesis. I have included a few resources below that explore the potential of this amazing technique.  

 

 

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Why A Blog?

  • Teachers need to be great learners to lead great learners. I believe that learning is a lifelong journey, an ongoing exploration and way of life. I challenge myself and others to always be striving to find and share big ideas in every million dollar conversation.

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